Barn Record Ellington

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Building Name (Common)
Seifert Farm
Building Name (Historic)
Seifert Farm
Address
44 Upper Butcher Road, Ellington
Typology
Overview

Designations

n/a

Historic Significance

Architectural description:

This is a multi-story chicken coop with a shed roof, built into a hill. The building appears to built in two stages. The first stage is the easternmost half of the structure. The main facade faces south. The main entry of this portion of the structure is an overhead garage door in the center of the main level. To the east and the west of the entry are a series of six-pane windows. Towards the west end of the first stage of the structure is a pass-through door and a door opening. A vertical board delineates the first stage of the structure from the second. The second level of the first stage of the structure has a series of six-pane windows and two doors. Separating the levels is a hood. The grade of the ground inclines slightly at the east end of the coop, leaving just the second level visible. The north facade of the coop starts with just the second level exposed and as the ground grade declines, the main level is revealed. The second level has a series of six-pane windows along the facade. The main level a series of six-pane windows along the facade as well as an overhead garage door.

The second stage is the westernmost half of the coop. The main entry in this portion of the structure is towards the center of the entire structure on south eave-facade. They are a pair of double-height overhead garage doors on the main level. To the west of the main entry are two window openings. To the east of the main entry is a window opening and a pass-through door. Directly to the east of the pass-through door is what appears to be the break in the building, dividing it into two sections. In the second level above this section is a series of six-pane windows and a door directly above the pass-through door on the main level. Separating the levels is a hood. The ground to the east grades away, revealing the basement level. This section has a bump-out on all three levels. The south facade of the bump-out has a single six-pane window centered in the main level and second level; the basement level has no apparent openings. There is a pass-through door on the west facade in the basement level of the bump-out. The rest of the basement level to the west has a series of six-pane windows. The main level and second level are identical and have a series of six-pane windows, except for a pass-through door near the center of each level in this section of the structure. Separating the levels is a hood.

The west gable-facade of the coop has a single six-pane window centered in each of the three levels. The north eave-facade of the coop at the west end has three six-pane windows and a pair of hinged pass-through door in the basement level. The ground grade up slightly to the main level. At the point in the grade that it inclines is a shed-roofed addition with an opening towards the west. The main level of the north eave-facade has a pair of swinging hinged doors at grade to the east of the shed-roofed addition and a series of six-pane windows on each side. The second level has a series of six-pane windows.  Separating the levels is a hood on the west portion of the facade.

The coop is clad in clapboards on the south, east and west facades of the first stage of the coop. The second stage of the coop is clad in clapboards on the south facade, except for the bump-out, which has asphalt siding. The west and north facades of the second stage of the coop also have asphalt siding.

Historical significance:

By the 1930s, large two-and three-story poultry barns were being built for raising broilers and capons for meat and pullets for eggs. These often have a shallow-pitched gable or shed roof and many windows on the south side, which are often covered with wire mesh. Mineral-surfaced asphalt paper or shingles typically cover the roof and walls. Housing thousands of birds, these large structures became virtual factories, with automatic, clock-activated feeders and waterers to reduce labor.

Field Notes

This farm was built by my grandfather and father. Building began in the 1950's with the 2 story chicken coop and ended in the 1960's with the back 3 story coop. The farm sits on 9 acres of land in Ellington with an amazing view of Ellington, Windsor Locks, Granby and beyond. It is fully functional and at one time held 22,000 commercial egg laying chickens and a herd of 30 sheep that were raised for slaughter. It is our family's pride and joy. We would love to have you visit.

Use & Accessibility

Use (Historic)

Use (Present)


Exterior Visible from Public Road?

Yes

Environment

Related features

Environment features

Relationship to surroundings

The coop is behind and to the north of the house it is associated with. The ridge-line of the house is parallel to the orientation of the coop. Behind and to the northeast of the house is a gable-entry garage. To the west of the house is a slightly smaller chicken coop. Between the house and the main coop is woodland. North of the coop is a tract of open space. A number of small sheds are scattered around the site, which is 9.29 acres. To the east of the barn is woodland. the area is residential, scattered agriculture, open space and woodland.

Typology & Materials

Building Typology

Materials


Structural System

Roof materials


Roof type


Approximate Dimensions

4400 S.F.

History

Date Compiled

08/10/2010

Compiled By

Todd Levine, reviewed by the Connecticut Trust

Sources

Photographs and field notes by Carol Roffey.

Sexton, James, PhD; Survey Narrative of the Connecticut Barn, Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation, Hamden, CT, 2005, http://www.connecticutbarns.org/history.

Visser, Thomas D.,Field Guide to New England Barns and Farm Buildings, University Press of New England, 1997.

Vision Appraisal Online Database. www.visionappraisal.com/Ellingtonct.

Map of the Ellington, CT, retrieved on August 5, 2010 from website www.zillow.com.

PhotosClick on image to view full file