Barn Record Washington

RETURN TO ‘FIND BARNS’
Building Name (Common)
Averill Farm
Building Name (Historic)
Averill Homestead
Address
250 Calhoun Street, Washington
Typology
Overview

Designations

Historic Significance

Architectural description:

This barn is actually a series of three barns attached together to form one large irregular shaped barn.  It is a 1 ½-story barn whose main façade faces north.  The ridge-line is approximately parallel with Calhoun Street which at this point runs approximately east to west.

Barn I:

This is the eastern most of the barns and it has a small shed-roof addition on the north façade.  The main entry is located on the west corner and consists of a pair exterior hung sliding doors.  The grade drops sharply towards the east, revealing a basement level.  On the east corner of the north eave-façade of Barn I is a small shed-roof addition, extending to the north.  There are no other details found on this façade.

In the basement level of the east gable-end of Barn I, found on the north corner is an exterior hung sliding door that slides towards the south.  A six-pane window is just to the south of this door.  Near the south corner of the east gable-end of the barn is a six-pane window, just to the south of this is another exterior hung sliding door.  This door slides to the north.  There appears to be a window opening in the gable-attic of the east gable end.  There appear to be no other details on this side.

The south eave-side of Barn I has an exterior hung sliding door on the east corner.  Just to the west of this is a six-pane window.  To the west of this are two windows, spaced evenly across the south eave-side of Barn I.  Centered below the eave appears to be a two-pane window.

Attached to and encompassing the entire west gable-end of Barn I is Barn II.

Barn II:

Barn II is the middle barn which attaches to Barn I on its east gable-end, encompassing this entire side.  The main entry is found on the north eave-façade of the barn, and consists of a pair of exterior hung sliding doors to the east of the center of the façade.  To the west is a sign that states “The Averill Homestead Founded 1746.”  Found on the west corner of the north eave-side of Barn II is an open bay.  Just above this is a hinged hay door.  There appear to be no other details on this side.  Attached to encompassing the entire west gable-end of Barn II is Barn III.

On the east corner of the south eave-side of Barn II is a window with an exterior hung sliding door just to the west of this.  Above the window is a six-pane window.  Just below the eaves near the west corner is what appears to be a two-pane window.  There appear to be no other details on this side.

Barn III:

This is the western most barn which attaches to Barn II on its east gable-end, encompassing this entire side.  The main entry is found on the north eave-façade of Barn III, and consists of a pair of exterior hung sliding doors on the east corner.  The western most door is a twelve-panel door with a row of two-pane windows.  To the west of the entry is a twelve-pane window.  Just above the entry, right below the eave is an exterior hung sliding hay-door.

Directly above the dropped girt line siding divide on the west gable-end of Barn III is an exterior hung sliding hay-door.  Just above this, in the gable attic is a twelve-pane window.  There are no other details on this side.

On the south eave-side of Barn III, near the west corner is a six-pane window.  Just to the west of this is an exterior hung sliding door with a hooded track.  The grade drops dramatically towards the east, revealing a basement level with open bays.  Above this, just below the eave are two windows spaced evenly.

The barn is clad in unpainted vertical flush-board siding.  The gable-roof is clad in asphalt shingles.  The small shed-roof addition attached to Barn I is built with concrete blocks.  The open bays on Barn III are held up with fieldstone pillars.

Old photographs reveal that this barn was once painted and had white trim.  In these photos, Barn I appears to have a large cupola that is no longer there.


Historical significance:


The oldest barns still found in the state are called the “English Barn,” “side-entry barn,” “eave entry,” or a 30 x 40. They are simple buildings with rectangular plan, pitched gable roof, and a door or doors located on one or both of the eave sides of the building based on the grain warehouses of the English colonists’ homeland. The name “30 by 40” originates from its size (in feet), which was large enough for 1 family and could service about 100 acres. The multi-purpose use of the English barn is reflected by the building’s construction in three distinct bays - one for each use. The middle bay was used for threshing, which is separating the seed from the stalk in wheat and oat by beating the stalks with a flail. The flanking bays would be for animals and hay storage.

The oldest barns still found in the state are called the “English Barn,” “side-entry barn,” “eave entry,” or a 30 x 40. They are simple buildings with rectangular plan, pitched gable roof, and a door or doors located on one or both of the eave sides of the building based on the grain warehouses of the English colonists’ homeland. The name “30 by 40” originates from its size (in feet), which was large enough for 1 family and could service about 100 acres. The multi-purpose use of the English barn is reflected by the building’s construction in three distinct bays - one for each use. The middle bay was used for threshing, which is separating the seed from the stalk in wheat and oat by beating the stalks with a flail. The flanking bays would be for animals and hay storage.  The 19th century saw the introduction of a basement under the barn to allow for the easy collection and storage of a winter’s worth of manure from the animals sheltered within the building. The bank or side-hill barn is characterized by the location of its main floor above grade, either through building into a hillside or by raising the building on a foundation. This innovation, aided by the introduction of windows for light and ventilation, would eventually be joined by the introduction of space to shelter more animals under the main floor of the barn.

Field Notes

Barn on family farm in continuous use since 1746 - Added to (and subtracted from: i.e. cupolas) over the years. 2009 Barn Grant recipient. Located in Calhoun-Ives National Register Historic District and Local Historic District. Photo-voltaic array added 2010-12. http://www.averillfarm.com/ Averill Farm is a family farm, which has been operated continuously by the Averills since it was purchased in 1746 from the holdings of Chief Waramaug. For many years it was a dairy farm. Today, the 260-acre property is primarily a fruit orchard, but also produces hay and Christmas trees. Sam Averill, of the ninth generation, runs the farm with his wife Susan, son Tyson (10th generation!), and several full and part-time employees. The apples and pears are grown in the 27-acre orchard and are sold both as picked fruit and pick-your-own (PYO). Some 100 varieties are grown, about 20 of which are available for customers to pick. Early apples come at the end of July or beginning of August and are sold either at farmers markets or self-service in front of the "Homestead". The PYO season begins mid August, when the orchard stand opens, and stays open seven days a week, 9:30am to 5:30pm, or dusk (after the time change), until Thanksgiving.

Use & Accessibility

Use (Historic)

Use (Present)


Exterior Visible from Public Road?

Yes

Demolished

No

Location Integrity

Unknown

Environment

Related features

Environment features

Relationship to surroundings

This barn is to the east of a smaller barn that is now used as a garage, which was once an ice house, but has since been converted.  To the east of the barn is a small shed.  Directly to the south of the barn are small outbuildings.  The house with which the barn is associated sits across the street.  This barn sits directly on Calhoun Street, on the south side of the road.  A driveway extends to the north, leading to the house.  To the northeast of the property is Quist Pond.  To the south is Salem Convenant Church.  To the northwest is Windemere Bed and Breakfast and 7C Herb Garden Bed and Breakfast.  Surrounding the property are open tracts of land, woodland, and few residential properties.

Typology & Materials

Building Typology

Materials


Structural System

Roof materials


Roof type


Approximate Dimensions

32 ft x 140 ft

Source

Date Compiled

08/26/2011

Compiled By

K. Young & T. Levine, reviewed by CT Trust

Sources

Field notes and photographs by Grant Pre-application 2009 - 2/22/2009.

Aerial Mapping: Washington Maps
http://www.bing.com/maps - accessed 8/26/2011.

Ransom, David F., Calhoun-Ives National Register Historic District No. 95001344, National Park Services, 1995.
http://pdfhost.focus.nps.gov/docs/NRHP/Text/95001344.pdf
http://pdfhost.focus.nps.gov/docs/NRHP/Photos/95001344.pdf

Local Historic District - Calhoun-Ives Historic District, 1989.

Sexton, James, PhD, Survey Narrative of the Connecticut Barn, Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation, Hamden, CT, 2005, http://www.connecticutbarns.org/history.

Visser, Thomas D.,Field Guide to New England Barns and Farm Buildings, University Press of New England, 1997.

PhotosClick on image to view full file