Barn Record New Hartford

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Building Name (Common)
Burdick Orchard
Building Name (Historic)
Burdick Orchard
Address
250 Town Hill Road (Rte 219), New Hartford
Typology
Overview

Designations

Historic Significance

Architectural description:

This is a 1 ½-story eave-entry bank barn with a partial hipped-upon-gable roof and several additions.  Single-bay additions project to the east at the northeast and southeast corners and to the west at the northwest corner.  Although the address of this barn is on Town Hill Road, it is actually situated near Burdick Road, which passes along the north end of this property.  The primary façade is the west eave-side, which faces Town Hill Road.  Town Hill Road passes this property on a north to south alignment.

The primary façade of this barn is the west eave-side.  The grade has been banked up along this side to be level with the first story along its entire length, retained at the northwest corner by a stone wall and embankment.  The primary entry on the façade is an off-center oversize wooden sliding door mounted on an overhead track.  A rectangular three-pane window is located to the immediate north of this door at floor level. 

Addition I is a single-bay gable-roof 1-story addition projecting to the west from the northwest corner.  The west gable-end of this addition contains a pair of over-size wooden sliding doors mounted on an overhead track.  The south eave-side of this addition is not visible for the purposes of an Historic Resource Inventory.  The north eave-side of the addition is in alignment with the north gable-end of the main barn, and both expose the full basement level.  The north eave-side of Addition I is blank on the first story.  A twelve-pane window arrangement is found within the wooden pass-through door located on the basement level of this addition, beside a two-pane horizontal window.

The north gable-end of the main barn exposes the full basement level along its full length.  Beginning where the west corner meets Addition I and working east on the basement level is a single six-pane window, followed by two pairs of six-pane windows with space in between.  The first floor contains two six-pane windows set symmetrically on this side.  A horizontal three-pane window is centered in the gable-attic on this end.

Addition II is a single-bay gable-roof 1-story addition projecting to the east from the northeast corner.  Similar to Addition I, this entire addition exposes the full basement-level.  The north eave-side of Addition II is blank on both the basement and first-stories.  The east gable-end contains a single centered six-pane window on the basement level, a square wooden hay door near the sill of the first story, and a three-pane horizontal window in the gable-attic of this addition.  A portion of the mortared fieldstone foundation is also visible on the gable-end of Addition II.  The south eave-side of this addition is not visible for the purposes of an Historic Resource Inventory. 

The east eave-side of the main barn reveals a full basement along this entire side, including both projection additions.  The basement level between Addition II and Addition III projects out slightly from the first-story, and is protected by a shed roof.  Beginning at the north end of this side and continuing south, first is a over-size wooden sliding door, mounted on an overhead track, followed by three evenly-spaced six-pane windows.  The first-story contains a single three-pane horizontal window.

Addition III is a single-bay gable-roof 1-story addition projecting to the east from the southeast corner.  The basement level is fully exposed on the north and east sides.  The north eave-side contains a single off-center six-pane window on the basement level, and a blank first-story.  The east gable-end partially exposes the brick foundation on the basement level.  A wood plank pass-through door is located near the northeast corner of the basement level, and a three-pane horizontal window is located in the south half on the basement level.  A three-pane horizontal window is also located in the gable-attic on this end.  The south eave-side of this addition is not visible for the purposes of an Historic Resource Inventory. 

The south gable-end of the main barn is not visible for the purposes of an Historic Resource Inventory.  The roof of the main barn is hipped-upon-gable on this gable-end.  A circular silo of architectural tile construction is located at the southwest corner of the main barn.  It is topped by a conical hipped roof with a spire at the apex.  A small gable-roof dormer containing a four-pane window is located faces west from within the silo roof, which is accessed by an iron ladder mounted to this side.  A second silo is located to the south of the barn near the southwest corner.  This second barn has no roof. 

The exterior walls around the first-story and within the gables of this barn are faced in narrow vertical wood siding.  The basement level on all exposed sides is faced in wide-width horizontal wooden siding.  Two small cupolas are spaced along the roof ridgeline of the main barn.  Each contain a square louvered vent on each side and are topped by a gable roof.  The main barn roof appears to be faced in gray asphalt shingles.


Historical significance:

The oldest barns still found in the state are called the “English Barn,” “side-entry barn,” “eave entry,” or a 30 x 40. They are simple buildings with rectangular plan, pitched gable roof, and a door or doors located on one or both of the eave sides of the building based on the grain warehouses of the English colonists’ homeland. The name “30 by 40” originates from its size (in feet), which was large enough for 1 family and could service about 100 acres. The multi-purpose use of the English barn is reflected by the building’s construction in three distinct bays - one for each use. The middle bay was used for threshing, which is separating the seed from the stalk in wheat and oat by beating the stalks with a flail. The flanking bays would be for animals and hay storage.

The 19th century saw the introduction of a basement under the barn to allow for the easy collection and storage of a winter’s worth of manure from the animals sheltered within the building. The bank barn is characterized by the location of its main floor above grade, either through building into a hillside or by raising the building on a foundation.

This innovation, aided by the introduction of windows for light and ventilation, would eventually be joined by the introduction of space to shelter more animals under the main floor of the barn.

Field Notes

Listed on the State Register of Historic Places 2/19/2014. This barn is part of Burdick Orchards. Originally, it was part of a large dairy operation run by Asa and Irving Burdick. The main dairy barn burned a number of years ago, but this barn and the milkhouse survived. The barn has an unusual layout. It is essentially a bank barn, with ground level access to the hayloft from the west, and ground level access to the livestock section on the north and east sides. The addition of two east bays and one bay on the northwest corner creates a distinctive floor plan. The silo on the southwest corner completes the symmetry. The silo is in very good shape, and is of block construction, its cap is similar to those found on Stedman and Torringford East roads. Block construction is also found at Intervale on Old Bruning Road.

Use & Accessibility

Use (Historic)

Use (Present)


Exterior Visible from Public Road?

Yes

Demolished

No

Location Integrity

Original Site

Environment

Related features

Environment features

Relationship to surroundings

Although the address of this barn is on Town Hill Road, it is set well back from that road and will be difficult to see.  It is much easier viewed from Burdick Road, which passes just to the north of this barn along the barn’s north gable-end.  Burdick Road divides the barn and an orchard from the farmhouse associated with this property, which is located on the north side of Burdick Road and much closer to Town Hill Road, to the barn’s northwest.  A fieldstone retaining wall separated the grade along the west (façade) of the barn from the exposed basement levels of the north gable-end and east eave-side.  An iron gate is located adjacent to the northeast corner of the barn.  A small orchard is located to the barn’s immediate west and southwest.  A small woodland is located to the southeast.  A small creek flows to the east of the barn, on a north and south alignment.  To the north of Burdick Street, the land is primarily agricultural fields intermixed with areas of woodland.

Typology & Materials

Building Typology

Materials


Structural System

Roof materials


Roof type


Approximate Dimensions

n/a

Source

Date Compiled

05/30/2011

Compiled By

N. Nietering & T. Levine, reviewed by CT Trust

Sources

Photographs by Anne C. Hall, 9/28/2010.

Sexton, James, PhD; Survey Narrative of the Connecticut Barn, Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation, Hamden, CT, 2005, http://www.connecticutbarns.org/history.

Visser, Thomas D.,Field Guide to New England Barns and Farm Buildings, University Press of New England, 1997, 213 pages.

Map of New Hartford, CT, retrieved on May 26, 2011 from website www.bing.com.

New Hartford Assessor’s Records - Vision Appraisal online - http://data.visionappraisal.com/NewHartfordCT

PhotosClick on image to view full file